Healthcare institutions and laboratories are encouraged to exercise and continue to practice appropriate clinical precautions when handling breath samples from patients. These groups should refer to their own policies on how to handle its COVID-19 response and should respond appropriately as the COVID-19 situation applies to and impacts its breath testing in its facilities.

Judgement on whether or not to test a patient using the BreathTek® UBT for H. pylori Kit should continue to be made by the patient’s prescribing physician and in collaboration with local testing laboratories on an individual patient basis.

While the COVID-19 situation continues to be dynamic, Otsuka sources the components of the BreathTek® UBT in the United States and currently does not foresee disruptions to its supply.

April 202005US20EBP0007

Healthcare institutions and laboratories are encouraged to exercise and continue to practice appropriate clinical precautions when handling breath samples from patients. These groups should refer to their own policies on how to handle its COVID-19 response and should respond appropriately as the COVID-19 situation applies to and impacts its breath testing in its facilities.

Judgement on whether or not to test a patient using the BreathTek® UBT for H. pylori Kit should continue to be made by the patient’s prescribing physician and in collaboration with local testing laboratories on an individual patient basis.

While the COVID-19 situation continues to be dynamic, Otsuka sources the components of the BreathTek® UBT in the United States and currently does not foresee disruptions to its supply.

April 202005US20EBP0007

<span class="hpylori-bold">H. pylori</span> in Children

H. pylori is a common chronic infection in children

  • Transmitted predominantly among family members, and associated with crowded living conditions1-3
    • Infection usually occurs in children younger than 10 years of age4
  • May become chronic without treatment5

*Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III of children ages 6 to 19 years.

Consequences of H. pylori infection in children

May cause:

  • Duodenal ulcers and gastric ulcers5
  • Progressive gastric mucosal damage5,6

Additional considerations:

  • International studies suggest H. pylori may cause growth delay in children5,7
  • Untreated childhood infection can lead to eventual development of malignancies such as gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma6

Diagnosing H. pylori infection in children

  • In most children, H. pylori infection is not clinically apparent, even when causing chronic active gastritis6
  • Children may present with gnawing or burning pain in the epigastrium, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite8
  • Look for transmission between mother and child and siblings, which is most common
  • Another determinant is living in or originating from high-prevalence areas2
H. pylori in children

This is a simple test that detects active infection with H. pylori, a Class I carcinogen that may be one factor leading to gastric cancer.9-11

BreathTek UBT is indicated for children ages 3 to 17 years old and must be administered by a health care professional, as ordered by a licensed health care practitioner.9

H. pylori is one of many contributing factors to gastric cancer.10 Invasive and noninvasive H. pylori diagnostic tools are available. BreathTek UBT is a reliable, noninvasive option.9

References
  • Staat MA, Kruszon-Moran D, McQuillan GM, Kaslow RA. A population-based serologic survey of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents in the United States. J Infect Dis. 1996;174(5):1120-1123.
  • Kivi M, Tindberg Y. Helicobacter pylori occurrence and transmission: a family affair? Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(6-7):407-417.
  • Cervantes DT, Fischbach LA, Goodman KJ, Phillips CV, Chen S, Broussard CS. Exposure to Helicobacter pylori–positive siblings and persistence of Helicobacter pylori infection in early childhood. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2010;50(5):481-485.
  • Malaty HM, El-Kasabany A, Graham DY, et al. Age at acquisition of Helicobacter pylori infection: a follow-up study from infancy to adulthood. Lancet. 2002;359(9310):931-935.
  • Pacifico L, Anania C, Osborn JF, Ferraro F, Chiesa C. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children. World J Gastroenterol. 2010;16(41):5181-5194.
  • Gold B, Colletti R, Abbott M, et al. Helicobacter pylori infections in children: recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2000;31(5):490-497.
  • Goodman KJ, Correa P, Mera R, et al. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on growth velocity of school-age Andean children. Epidemiology. 2011;22(1):118-126.
  • Uc A, Chong SK. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori gastritis improves dyspeptic symptoms in children. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2002;34(3):281-285.
  • BreathTek UBT [package insert]. Rockville, MD: Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.; 2019.
  • The Centre for Digestive Diseases. Helicobacter pylori. http://centrefordigestivediseases.com/helicobacter-pylori/. Accessed March 12, 2019.
  • Ables AZ, Simon I, Melton ER. Update on Helicobacter pylori treatment. Am Fam Physician. 2007;75(3):351-358.